The fire-damaged building on Fourth Avenue is scheduled to be demolished

In this photo in the file, a firefighter pulls a hose as smoke billows out of Griswold's office facilities and equipment in downtown Olympia on Saturday, July 31, 2004.

In this photo in the file, a firefighter pulls a hose as smoke billows out of Griswold’s office facilities and equipment in downtown Olympia on Saturday, July 31, 2004.

Olympian

The former Griswold office building, which burned down 18 years ago and then turned into an ulcer on the eye before its exterior was illuminated by a mural, is finally leaving, the city of Olympia has announced.

Demolition begins Monday at 308-310 on Fourth Avenue East. The city has awarded $ 287,000 to Rognlin’s contact company from Aberdeen for the work, which will take place from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The project is designed for 20 working days and, as noted in the city, should be completed by March 25.

Residents should expect the following:

Noise of equipment during working hours.

Inaccessible parking spaces in front of the building.

Closure of sidewalks and oil.

Minor traffic delays from trucks removing garbage from the site.

The city will also work with garbage collection companies. Garbage containers will need to be placed on the street if it is affected by overlapping oils.

According to the city, Griswold was destroyed by fire in July 2004. Later, the city bought the plot in 2016, after which a public-private agreement was signed to create a multifunctional building for 30-40 apartments.

Under a contract unanimously approved by Olympia City Council last May, the city will pay for the demolition of the building before selling it for $ 50,000 to Urban Olympia, a developer owned by Walker John with a large downtown presence, according to The Olympian .

The contract also stipulates that Urban Olympia will apply for an exemption from the apartment building tax, which means that the project will not pay property tax on the value of the building for 12 years.

Under the terms of the contract, 60 percent of the premises must be handed over at affordable rates for 12 years. This percentage is then reduced to 30 percent of units from 13-15 years, and finally to 20 percent of units that must remain available for a full 20 years, according to a report by The Olympian.

“To be able to get affordable housing downtown with a validity period for part of the damaged property, she is inspecting a lot of boxes,” said Mike Reed, the city’s director of economic development at the time.

1Griswold's.jpg
May 4, 2021 Exterior photo of the former Griswold office supplies and equipment store in downtown Olympia, which was destroyed in a fire in July 2004. Steve Bloom sbloom@theolympian.com

This story was originally published February 27, 2022 1:15 p.m.

Rolf has been with The Olympian since August 2005. It covers the latest news, the city of Lacey and business for the newspaper. Rolf graduated from The Evergreen State College in 1990.

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