The Virginia Wildlife Center warns that snakes need help this winter to get through a difficult situation

Glue traps are commonplace when it comes to pest control, but the Virginia Blue Ridge Wildlife Center warns that they could create negative consequences for our crawling friends this winter.

Glue traps are commonplace when it comes to pest control, but in Virginia Blue Ridge Wildlife Center warns that they could create negative consequences for our slithery reptilian friends this winter.

Snakes that enter indoors and are caught in glue traps face the dangers of dehydration, exhaustion, and injuries caused by the trap itself or improper removal methods.



As temperatures drop outside, snakes are more likely to seek shelter indoors, where the wildlife center says the snakes will serve as pest control agents, “destroying on cold days and eating insects and small vertebrates on warm days.” .

According to the center, current temperatures prevent indoor snakes from being exposed outside because “it’s too cold for them to find an alternative shelter to brumate,” which is the reptile’s version of hibernation.

If it’s too late to get rid of glue traps because the snake in your home is already in dire straits, Blue Ridge said don’t try to remove it yourself.

“Cover the sticky parts with whatever you have available (corn flakes, paper towel, etc.), cover the animal with a towel, place everything in a dark box, and take it to a local rehab center as soon as possible for safe removal and evaluation,” the tweet center.

The wildlife center said under no circumstances should a snake be released after being trapped in a glue trap without a specialist assessment.

As WTOP on Facebook and follow WTOP Twitter and Instagram participate in the conversation about this article and others.

Get the latest news and daily headlines delivered to your inbox by signing up here.

Β© 2022 WTOP. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located in the European Economic Area.

Source link